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Curriculum: Grade 10

Advanced French: Paris: Past, Present, and Future

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Prerequisite: French 4/Honors French 4 with a A- or higher and/or departmental approval

This course focuses on the history, architecture, and culture of Paris from its humble Roman beginnings to present-day initiatives that look toward a sustainable future. Students will continue to hone their linguistic skills by reading historical documents, articles, and literary works (drama, poetry, and prose) as well as by analyzing maps, paintings, and photographs. Students enrolling in this course must have considerable competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French and a willingness to refine their French through significant independent work. The linguistic focus of this course is increased fluency, accuracy, and complexity in all modes of communication: presentational, interpersonal, and interpretive.

Advanced French: Literature and Culture of the French-Speaking Caribbean

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: French 4/Honors French 4 with a A- or higher and/or departmental approval

This course focuses on the literature and culture of the French-speaking Caribbean. Students will continue to hone their linguistic skills by engaging with some of the French-speaking Caribbean’s most important literary figures, including Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), Aimé Césaire (Martinique), and René Depestre (Haiti). In addition to literary texts, students will examine the painting, music, history, and politics of the region. Students enrolling in this course must have considerable competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. The linguistic focus of this course is increased fluency, accuracy, and complexity in all modes of communication.

Advanced Spanish: Contemporary Life in the Spanish-Speaking World

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Spanish 4/Honors Spanish 4 with a B- or higher and departmental approval

Advanced Spanish is for Upper School students who have completed four previous Spanish courses, or have special permission from the Language Department. As such, the course will emphasize advanced communication and listening skills. Reading at an advanced level will consist of articles of varying topics, books, poetry, and short stories relating to contemporary themes. Writing skills will be enhanced to include personal narratives with emphasis on improved grammar, which will be an integral aspect of the course. Previously learned Spanish will be reviewed and reinforced, while advanced grammatical structures will be introduced for continued growth in presentational writing. Students will also continue to learn about the many cultures throughout the Spanish-speaking world through a global citizen lens.

Advanced Latin: What is Love? Latin Love Poetry

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Latin 3/Honors Latin 3 and departmental approval

This course explores Roman ideas of love through the poetry of Catullus, Horace, Ovid and Sulpicia (one of the few female authors of the period whose work survives). Students in this course will learn about how the Romans perceived romantic relationships and how those ideas are both similar to and different from our ideas about love today. We will also examine the gendered experience of loving and being loved in the ancient world. In addition to continuing their study of the Latin language through these texts, students will work on their analytical writing through essays (in English) and creative assignments.

American Literature and Culture: LINGo

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10

English

Credits: 1

This course is designed for new international students for whom English is a newly acquired language or who have not attended an American school before. Students explore American culture and literature through challenging and accessible choices of short fiction, drama, novels, and poetry. Each student becomes familiar with the terms and methods for literary analysis; creative writing is also an essential part of this course. Every student is coached to fluency in written and spoken English during the class discussions. Students will also learn the conventions of MLA style and the writing process. Upon the teacher’s recommendation, entry into the next level of the English program is facilitated when the student is ready.

3D Design (Spring)

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

Visual Arts courses are offered at several different levels. Students with a passion for a particular field may register for the same course over multiple semesters.

This art course has been designed to offer students a general design overview using different media to construct and build 3D projects utilizing art design concepts. The focus of the course is to concentrate on applying the basic elements and principles of art to help the students solve artistic, creative problems in a variety of approaches and media. Projects in additive and subtractive sculpture, carving, construction, mobile, assemblage, molding and casting, as well as modelmaking will be studied. A sketchbook is required for all students to be used in class and for homework assignments. This course references historical and contemporary works.

3D Design (Fall)

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

Visual Arts courses are offered at several different levels. Students with a passion for a particular field may register for the same course over multiple semesters.

This course has been designed to offer students a general design overview using paper and paper pulp to construct and build 3D projects utilizing art design concepts. The focus of the course is to concentrate on applying the basic elements and principles of art to help students solve artistic, creative problems in a variety of approaches and media. Projects in paper making and paper casting, cardboard relief, paper dress, relief drawing, papier mache, and book art/deconstructed books will be studied. A sketchbook is required for all students to be used in class and for homework assignments. This course references historical and contemporary works.

Studio Art (Upper School)

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5 per semester

Visual Arts courses are offered at several different levels. Students with a passion for a particular field may register for the same course over multiple semesters.

Open to Grades 9-12; full year or single semester

This class is designed to accommodate students with a desire to learn about art or to continue evolving in their artistic pursuits. Students will work on a variety of media, tools, and techniques through open-ended assignments that challenge them and encourage creativity and originality. Through studio practice, application of the fundamentals of art and informed decision making, students will create a body of work that demonstrate a high level of quality and growth over time in content, technique and process.

Printmaking

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

Visual Arts courses are offered at several different levels. Students with a passion for a particular field may register for the same course over multiple semesters.

This course introduces the student to the production of multiple images from a single design. Students will learn about the basic tools and materials used in a variety of printmaking techniques, understanding that printing will produce a reversed image. For this, an emphasis on creative problem-solving is essential, through research, sketching, and idea development before committing to a plate. Students will explore various printmaking techniques including but not limited to linoleum – block printing, drypoint, image transfer, and stamping, as well as monoprint/monotype, and stenciling. They will learn about the effective use of positive and negative space, and the creation of an artist’s proofs and series. A brief overview of historical and contemporary prints, including the use of prints for political or social messaging will be addressed.

Photography 2

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

Prerequisite: Photography 1

This course is designed to follow on from the prerequisite Photography 1 and includes elements of studio photography, green screen photography, street photography and drone photography. DSLR cameras are supplied for the duration of the course. The course will generate proficiency in Adobe Creative Cloud Lightroom and Photoshop techniques and will incorporate field trips for photography assignments. It will also include an emphasis on independent studies as students focus on their own interests, all the while creating an online portfolio of their best work.

Photography 1

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

This semester-long course is designed to cover a broad range of digital photography techniques, principles, equipment, and image subjects. A Nikon DSLR camera is supplied for the duration of the course. The course also covers areas of post production and image manipulation. It includes principles of exposure, portrait photography, landscape photography, macro photography, sports photography, food photography, black and white photography, low light photography, light painting, wildlife photography, in-class challenges, and more than 20 other topics. Over the course of the semester, independent shooting, collaborative peer critiques, and historical research will contribute to each student’s final portfolio that exhibits her individual photographic style.

Painting

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

Visual Arts courses are offered at several different levels. Students with a passion for a particular field may register for the same course over multiple semesters.

In this class, students will be able to explore different “wet media” with processes such as transparent and opaque painting including watercolor, gouache, acrylic, and oil. Students discover the expressiveness of color and paint application techniques while learning color theory. They will also be introduced to the ancient medium of encaustic painting. The focus of this course is on color, scale, and composition and how these are fundamental elements in the development of their visual concepts. Students may take this class as a repeated course in order to prepare their art portfolios for college admission, as well as to work on public art projects that enhance the School community.

Movie/Video Production

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

This is a semester course designed to cover all facets of movie production, including script writing, working with talent, camera work, sound, directing, locations, costume, props, and post-production editing. Nikon DSLR cameras will be supplied for the duration of the course. Genre types will include shorts, feature films, documentaries, music videos, and comedy sketches. The course will involve hands-on, small team experience developing production timelines and filming with DSLR cameras after review of best-practice examples of each motion-picture type. Instruction in post-production editing techniques will be taught to allow finished products to be shown to the local community and/or entered into film showcases and festivals.

Graphic Publication

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Fall Semester (can be extended for extra credit into Spring Semester)

Credits: .5

This course allows students to develop the design, writing, and photography skills needed to create a thorough, interesting, and dynamic documentation of the life of the School: the official school yearbook, the Pepperpot. Includes elements of art, film, image manipulation, design, layout, article writing, research, editing, marketing, publishing and sales. Students will have additional responsibilities and take greater leadership roles each time the course is taken.

Drawing

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5 per semester

Visual Arts courses are offered at several different levels. Students with a passion for a particular field may register for the same course over multiple semesters.

The course may be taken for a full year or single semester.

Drawing is the foundation from which we develop our visual vocabulary as we hone our observational skills. Drawing from observation or from life is a critical skill to develop for anyone wanting to quickly and visually express ideas, as it trains the eye, hand, and brain to translate the 3D form into a 2D illusion. In this multilevel class, whether taken for the first time or as continuation to further develop one’s drawing skills, students will be exposed to a variety of “dry media,” learning the necessary technical skills to communicate their ideas, while continuing to strengthen their knowledge of the elements and principles of design. Students may take this class as a repeated course in order to prepare their art portfolios for college admission.

Ceramics (Upper School)

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

Visual Arts courses are offered at several different levels. Students with a passion for a particular field may register for the same course over multiple semesters.

The Ceramics class will provide an opportunity for students to develop a body of work that is both conceptually valid and reflective of their artistic style. Sculpture techniques, the science of glazing, and wheel skills are taught to all levels of students, and they will be encouraged to experiment at all times. In addition to developing technique, students will design their own multi-part construction based on exploration of pottery around the world. Each student will be expected to produce work that portrays her creative powers and technical abilities.

Art History: Ancient Egypt to the Renaissance

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

This course is cross-listed with both the Visual Arts and History Departments.

This course will provide a multidisciplinary approach to the study of art and architectural history. Students will gain an understanding of the differences between a formal and contextual analysis of a work of art, learn to formulate a thesis, and engage in both forms of analysis. Students will view the art through a lens of historical events, literature, music, and the social context of the time periods studied. This course begins by looking at Ancient Egyptian art and architecture through Europe, the Middle East, and Asia into the Renaissance. By studying great works from within these artistic periods, students will gain a better understanding of the visual art of each era and of how they fit within the context of their time.

African Drumming

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

African Drumming is an essential part of Walker’s Music Program. The group utilizes a variety of drums, some of which were constructed from trees on the School property in Simsbury. Students study a wide array of styles and develop an appreciation for the intricate musical sounds, and variety of moods the different drumming disciplines convey and express. The tones of the instruments as well as the use of a particular rhythm open the mind to the rich world of music and enhance the capacity of each drummer. Students are encouraged to both read and hear patterns so that they engage the better part of themselves when they play together. The group often performs on campus and continues to create a moving presence at Walker’s.

Orchestra

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Orchestra is open to instrumentalists who are capable of individual preparation and working toward a standard of musical excellence in a group setting. This is a wonderful environment in which to develop technique and broaden the musical experience.

Harmonious Bells

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

The bell choir performs for many events on campus and can be taken as a music discipline for music majors. This course teaches a basic understanding of rhythm and note reading and allows students of all levels to perform in an ensemble. All musicians are welcome.

Group Keyboard

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

This course provides beginner to intermediate piano students with an opportunity to improve their keyboard skills. The classes allow each student to progress at her own pace. Students are invited to participate in recitals at the end of the year. All musicians are welcome.

Grapes

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

By audition

This vocal ensemble is an a cappella singing group. Only members of the Choir may audition. This ensemble performs music from the folk, pop, jazz, and Broadway genres. Auditions take place at the beginning of the school year and include a simple sight-singing exercise, presentation of a piece that best shows the singer’s voice, and a group piece that determines vocal blend and intonation.

Chamber Ensembles

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

By audition

The chamber ensembles afford the serious musician the opportunity to perform fine works. Students must be proficient on their instrument and enjoy working in a focused, musical environment. These ensembles are called upon to perform at many functions throughout the school year.

Music Major Program

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: 1

Credit is given to students who wish to take two private lessons a week or two music disciplines, not including Choir. A half credit is given along with grades and comments for each semester. Music majors are expected to perform during the school year.

Music Theory

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: 1

A two–semester course that can be taken as a lesson or as a credited course. The course is taught at the level of the student and progresses according to her capacity. It presents the basics of music theory, dictation and notation, and ear training. The advanced student may study composition and musical analysis.

Choir

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: 1

A full Arts credit is given for this course. It fulfills the arts graduation requirement but is not figured into the GPA. Walker’s Choir performs regularly at many School functions and presents two major choral concerts. All singers are welcome.

Group Voice

Middle School, Upper School

Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn and improve vocal technique and to experience a repertoire of various styles. Enrollment in choir is not required. Voce Felice, a fine vocal ensemble, is formed from members of this class. Individual singers have the opportunity to perform as soloists at the end of the school year concert. All singers are welcome.

Gospel Choir

Middle School, Upper School

Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

The Gospel Choir is a lively vocal ensemble that incorporates musical styles from the spiritual, blues, and gospel genres. This ensemble demands a willingness to participate in the appropriate style that this music commands. All singers are welcome.

Music Lessons

Middle School, Upper School

Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Additional fee

Private lessons are offered for many instruments. Numerous recitals and assemblies involve the Music Program, and public performance at these events is encouraged.

Financial Commitment: Private lessons are billed through the Business Office. The Music Instruction Agreement must be signed by a parent/guardian and returned before lessons can begin. Please contact the Business Office for additional details.

Spring Musical

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: Spring season co-curricular

Prerequisite: Audition in February

Offered: February-May

The Theatre, Music, and Dance Departments collaborate on a full-scale musical that is presented to the community in May. Recent productions include Seussical, The Boyfriend, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Godspell, Illyria, You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown, Sister Act, Beauty and the Beast, and Hairspray.

Winter Play

Middle School, Upper School

Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: Winter season co-curricular

Prerequisite: Audition in November

Offered: November-February

During the winter months, cast members rehearse a play which is presented to the community in mid-February. Past productions have included Good Help is so Hard to Murder, Haiku, Animal Farm, All in the Timing, Rope, and an original Shakespearean adaptation, The Food of Love.

Musical Theater

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

In this class, students will collaborate on scenes, songs, and dances from classic works of musical theater. Students will have the opportunity to watch and learn from historic theatrical performances, as well as delve deeply into scene work, song analysis, and choreography. This class includes visits from industry guest speakers; the class will take theatrical field trips.

Acting

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Credits: .5

The goal of this course is to develop self-awareness, master acting guideposts, and build on previous knowledge of stage acting through the use of scenes, improvisation, and monologues. This one-semester class introduces students to basic acting techniques, including effective use of the voice, principles of stage movement, building a character, playwriting, story creation, and improvisation. The course is designed for students interested in exploring theater as a means of personal development and expression, as well as for those who wish to begin to study the craft of acting and/or playwriting. Students are expected to memorize lines, write journals, and be evaluated on their performances. This course may be taken more than once, so the course will be tailored to the students’ interests and needs.

General Enrollment Dance

Middle School, Upper School

Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Fall, winter, and spring season

These classes are open to students at any level of dance from beginner to advanced. Students take classes in ballet, modern, jazz, and composition. Winter dance also counts towards the team sport requirement as it includes a performance.

Dance Ensemble

Middle School, Upper School

Grade 6, Grade 7, Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Prerequisite: Fall and winter season commitment; By audition

Dance Ensemble is the high-intermediate level dance company at Walker’s. Students are selected by audition and must commit to dance for the fall and winter seasons. Dance Ensemble members take daily intermediate level technique classes in ballet, modern, jazz, and character. This group also has the opportunity to work with guest artists and they perform in the annual Winter Dance Concert.

Dance Workshop

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Arts

Prerequisite: Fall and winter season commitment; By audition

Dance Workshop is the advanced-level dance company at Walker’s. Students are selected by audition and must commit to dance for the fall and winter seasons. Dance Workshop members take daily advanced-level technique classes in ballet, modern, jazz, character, and stretch and strengthen. These classes are supplemented with weekly rehearsals for student, faculty, and guest artist choreography. Senior members of Dance Workshop take choreography classes and run their own rehearsals. Dance Workshop performs in the annual Winter Dance Concert.

Personal Finance

Upper School

Grade 10

Seminars

Historically, women have had less opportunity to manage money or invest. As students graduate from high school and move out into the world, it’s imperative that they possess an understanding of personal finance in order to make informed decisions that will affect their financial futures. In this course students will explore a variety of topics including make/spend/save/give, earned and unearned income, loans and credit cards, interest, personal income taxes, and investing. Students will study for an IRS exam that will allow them to complete personal income taxes through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program.

Women, Health, & Culture

Upper School

Grade 10

Seminars

Women, Health, & Culture is a semester-long seminar course taught by Walker’s director of health services. Using a medical model, comprehensive analysis of issues related to the health status and health care of women is presented in this course. A broad spectrum of topics is explored. Knowledge of health concerns of particular importance to women are shared to aid in maintaining wellness, as well as assisting in the identification and early treatment of specific physical illnesses. All students will be instructed in American Red Cross Child and Adult CPR as well as use of an automatic external defibrillator (AED). Women, Health, & Culture is designed to aid students in becoming critical thinkers about health and wellness issues facing young people today. It is expected that they will be knowledgeable about current events that affect young women. After class discussions on a specific topic, a short in-class opinion essay may be required. Class participation is an important part of this course.

Wellness

Upper School

Grade 10

Seminars

The Wellness course is based on concepts from positive psychology, and social and emotional intelligence to help students develop a strong sense of well being. Activities are designed to strengthen self-awareness, emotional resilience, and self-esteem. Using tools such as the Johari Window, students learn relationship-building skills and develop social awareness. Other activities include identifying signature strengths using UPenn’s Authentic Happiness Site and practicing mindful meditation. Additional topics include healthy sleep habits, stress management, and learning and memory. Grades are based on in-class activities as well as independent journaling. A significant part of the grade is based on class citizenship, including participation in class discussions and consistent demonstration of active listening skills and respect for others.

Engineering

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Science

Credits: .5

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval

This is a semester-long course for students who have demonstrated passion for overcoming challenges in innovative ways. Through this 100% hands-on, project-based course, students will immerse themselves in the process of engineering – defining a problem and identifying its constraints, brainstorming solutions, creating and evaluating a prototype, iterating to improve their prototype, and communicating their solution. Students will develop confidence and fluidity in this process over the course of the semester. The challenges encountered in this course will focus on different types of  engineering, possibly including mechanical, electrical, civil, and environmental engineering. Students will develop skills in group collaboration and will be encouraged to make use of all of their available tools and resources. Students will be evaluated based on in-class engagement, fulfillment of project components, documentation of their unique engineering process, written reflections, and an analysis of their work.

Honors Chemistry

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Science

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Honors Physics 9 and concurrent enrollment in Honors Algebra 2 or departmental approval

The Honors Chemistry course covers content similar to the Chemistry course with the addition of stoichiometry and acid-base chemistry. The course is fast paced and requires a sophisticated depth of analysis. As students progress through the year, their work increasingly focuses on the applications of basic concepts and involves complex, mult-istep problem solving. Lab work includes a focus on experimental design and requires more involved error analysis. This is a rigorous course with high expectations for student effort and commitment.

Chemistry

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Science

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Chemistry is a laboratory-based course that allows students to discover basic chemical principles and understand how to use them to make sense of the world around them. The course covers the scientific method, measurement, atomic theory, nomenclature, chemical quantities, chemical reactions, aqueous chemistry, bonding, and gas laws. Students learn how to work both collaboratively and individually. Laboratory work emphasizes making careful observations, learning correct measuring and data collection techniques, analyzing data, and discussing errors. Projects each semester enable students to explore how chemistry is relevant to their daily lives.

Advanced Computer Science

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Mathematics

Credits: .5

Open to Grades 11-12, and sophomores with approval of instructor.

Advanced Computer Science aims to introduce students to a broad array of concepts in computer science. Students will use the Javascript programming language to explore complex problem solving, algorithm design and implementation, and coding their own program. Topics include number systems, the internet, data visualization and various programming concepts such as variables, loops, arrays, object, formal logic, and processing.

Statistics

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Mathematics

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and departmental approval

Open to Grades 11-12, and sophomores with approval of instructor.

This course will include extensive studies of probability and statistics, sampling, data analysis, combinations/permutations, and notation. Students will learn real-world applications of these concepts, completing numerous projects to learn the ways in which statistics frame the way we view the world around us. This course will provide students who have completed at least math through Algebra 2 with math skills that are readily applicable to their lives.

Honors French 4

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of French 3 with an A- or higher and Honors Contract

Learners who are interested in earning Honors credit are required to complete independently motivated work. This work encompasses tasks using all appropriate modes of communication: interpretive reading, interpretive listening, presentational writing and speaking, and interpersonal speaking. Additionally, learners who wish to earn Honors credit will be held to higher expectations on assessments.

French 4

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of French 3

This course is a continuation of French 3. Learners will examine the history, contemporary life, art, and culture of the French-speaking world, while reinforcing and building upon the skills developed in Levels 1-3. This course uses authentic literature and film to expose learners to diverse Francophone perspectives. Learners are expected to make cultural comparisons, participate in individual and group analysis, and draw conclusions about historical and current events. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves fully and spontaneously in paragraph-length language on a wide variety of everyday topics as well as topics of personal or general interest. Learners will be able to formulate and support hypotheses, make arguments, and sustain narration in multiple time frames. Students will be able to negotiate meaning in a wide range of unfamiliar contexts with confidence.

Honors French 3

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of French 2 and departmental approval

This course is a continuation of French 2. Learners will build upon the structures they acquired in French 2 and engage in the target language with greater ease. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves in increasingly complex sentences on a variety of everyday topics, topics of personal interest, and studied topics. Specific structures that learners will acquire include: what they should/could/would have done, what they would/could/should do, necessity, opinions, feelings. Learners will be able to comfortably negotiate meaning in a wide range of unfamiliar contexts. Learners who are interested in earning Honors credit are required to complete independently motivated work. This work encompasses tasks using all appropriate modes of communication: interpretive reading, interpretive listening, presentational writing and speaking, and interpersonal speaking. Additionally, learners who wish to earn Honors credit will be held to higher expectations on assessments.

French 3

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of French 2

This course is a continuation of French 2. Learners will build upon the structures they acquired in French 2 and engage in the target language with greater ease. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves in increasingly complex sentences on a variety of everyday topics, topics of personal interest, and studied topics. Specific structures that learners will acquire include: what they should/could/would have done, what they would/could/should do, as well as expressing counterfactuals, necessity, opinions, and feelings. Learners will be able to comfortably negotiate meaning in a range of unfamiliar contexts.

French 2

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of French 1

This course is a continuation of French 1. Learners will build upon the structures they acquired in French 1 and engage in the target language with greater ease. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves in complete sentences on a variety of familiar topics. Specific structures that learners will acquire include: what they were doing or used to do and what they will do.

French 1

Middle School, Upper School

Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

This course serves as an introduction to the French language through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. By the end of the year, learners will be able to talk about very familiar topics: themselves; the weather; their likes, dislikes, and preferences; their families and homes; their favorite pastimes and hobbies; what they did over the past weekend as well as what they are going to do over the next weekend; and what they want to do versus what they can or must do. Learners will develop the ability to negotiate meaning in unfamiliar contexts.

Advanced Spanish: Modern Literature and Advanced Topics

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Spanish 4/Honors Spanish 4 with a B- or higher and departmental approval

Students will read and interpret texts of representative Hispanic writers within the 20th and 21st centuries, but with a special focus on contemporary authors. Students will explore and analyze the poems, short stories, and essays from writers such as Juan Rulfo, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Ana María Matute, Nancy Morejón, Rubén Darío, and Isabel Allende. The course will revolve around student commentary and analysis of texts within historical and cultural contexts, thereby requiring daily oral and written participation from all students.

Honors Spanish 4

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 3 with an A- or higher and Honors Contract

Learners who are interested in earning Honors credit are required to complete independently motivated work. This work encompasses tasks using all appropriate modes of communication: interpretive reading, interpretive listening, presentational writing and speaking, and interpersonal speaking. Additionally, learners who wish to earn Honors credit will be held to higher expectations on assessments.

Spanish 4

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 3

This course is a continuation of Spanish 3. Learners will examine the history, contemporary life, art, and culture of Spain and Latin America, while reinforcing and building upon the skills developed in Levels 1-3. This course uses authentic literature and film to expose students to Spanish and Latin American perspectives as well as the importance of Spanish in the United States. Learners are expected to make cultural comparisons, participate in individual and group analysis, and draw conclusions about historical and current events. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves fully and spontaneously in paragraph-length language on a wide variety of everyday topics as well as topics of personal or general interest. Learners will be able to formulate and support hypotheses, make arguments, and sustain narration in multiple time frames. Students will be able to negotiate meaning in a wide range of unfamiliar contexts with confidence.

Honors Spanish 3

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 2 and Departmental Approval

This course is a continuation of Spanish 2. Learners will build upon the structures they acquired in Spanish 2 and engage in the target language with greater ease. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves in increasingly complex sentences on a variety of everyday topics, topics of personal interest, and studied topics. Specific structures that learners will acquire include: what they should/could/would have done, what they would/could/should do, necessity, opinions, feelings. Learners will be able to comfortably negotiate meaning in a wide range of unfamiliar contexts. Learners who are interested in earning Honors credit are required to complete independently motivated work. This work encompasses tasks using all appropriate modes of communication: interpretive reading, interpretive listening, presentational writing and speaking, and interpersonal speaking. Additionally, learners who wish to earn Honors credit will be held to higher expectations on assessments.

Spanish 3

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 2

This course is a continuation of Spanish 2. Learners will build upon the structures they acquired in Spanish 2 and engage in the target language with greater ease. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves in increasingly complex sentences on a variety of everyday topics, topics of personal interest, and studied topics. Specific structures that learners will acquire include: what they should/could/would have done, what they would/could/should do, necessity, opinions, and feelings. Learners will be able to comfortably negotiate meaning in a wide range of unfamiliar contexts.

Spanish 2

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 1

This course is a continuation of Spanish 1. Learners will build upon the structures they acquired in Spanish 1 and engage in the target language with greater ease. By the end of the year, learners will be able to express themselves in complete sentences on a variety of familiar topics. Specific structures that learners will acquire include: what they were doing or used to do and what they will do. Learners will continue to develop the ability to negotiate meaning in unfamiliar contexts.

Spanish 1

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

This course serves as an introduction to the Spanish language through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. By the end of the year, learners will be able to talk about very familiar topics: themselves; the weather; their likes, dislikes, and preferences; their families and homes; their favorite pastimes and hobbies; what they did over the past weekend as well as what they are going to do over the next weekend; what they want to do versus what they can or must do, as well as developing the ability to negotiate meaning in unfamiliar contexts.

Holding Out for a Hero: Virgil’s Aeneid

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Latin 3/Honors Latin 3 and department approval

Virgil’s Aeneid is the central text of Roman literature, and its hero, Aeneas, is at the center of the story. What makes a hero? What makes a leader? In this yearlong course, students explore Roman ideas of loyalty, loss and leadership through Virgil’s text. Through a study of meter, word order, poetic device and vocabulary, students grapple with the themes of love and death, war and refugees, and family and fate. Students also delve into the politics and propaganda of the Age of Augustus and explore our own relationship to empire and unwanted war. In this class, students read selections of the poem in Latin and the entire poem in English. Students express themselves through analytical essays as well as creative projects. Just as Aeneas’ Trojans had to work together to get to Rome, so too is collaboration an emphasis of this class, and students are expected – and assessed – on how well they work together.

Honors Latin 3

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Latin 2 and Honors Contract

Learners who are interested in earning Honors credit are required to complete independently motivated work. This work encompasses interpretive reading tasks that involve deeper and more sustained engagement with Latin texts. Additionally, learners who wish to earn Honors credit will be held to higher expectations on assessments.

Latin 3

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Latin 2

Latin 3 begins with the final stages of Latin grammar: the subjunctive. Through an adapted telling of the Odyssey, students become comfortable with this final frontier of grammar. Students also begin to develop analytical skills from reading one cohesive text over a whole semester. Once the subjunctive is mastered, students move on to authentic Latin authors, beginning with Julius Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. From there, students read excerpts of Catullus, Horace and Ovid, preparing them for the more challenging Latin texts of Advanced Latin. At this point, students learn how to write essays analyzing Latin texts, exploring the language on a level deeper than the grammatical. Students will interpret texts on a sophisticated level, using their knowledge of the cultural context as well as their language skills.

Latin 2

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Completion of Latin 1

In Latin 2, students begin to go deeper with their Latin language skills, learning more challenging and sophisticated grammatical concepts. In this class, students go from being students of Latin to translators of Latin, and they begin to understand the nuances and artistry of the language. Students are assessed through reading passages of increasing length and difficulty. Through the readings, students learn about myths and legends of the ancient world, and assess how we can learn about Roman culture from studying the stories they told.

Latin 1

Upper School

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

World Languages

Credits: 1

What is Ancient Rome, and why do we care? In this first year course, students will learn about the ancient world through geography, mythology, history, archaeology, and, of course, language. Students will master the foundations of Latin grammar, including the core grammatical concept of inflection. Through short readings, plays, and cartoons, students will become comfortable interacting with Latin prose. Collaboration is a core component of the class, and students will also learn about how best to work together in large and small groups. Special attention will also be given to the context of the ancient world. Students will learn about Roman families, houses, and urban and rural domestic life. They will also explore Roman religion and mythology, including the Olympians and the myths that shape many of the stories we tell today. Finally, students will explore the architecture of the city of Rome, and imagine themselves among the streets of the Eternal City.

Advanced Human Geography

Upper School

Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

History and Social Science

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval

This course is a fast-paced, upper-level social studies course that introduces students to the patterns and processes that have shaped the understanding, use and alterations of Earth. Students will be expected to understand and analyze maps and spatial data, recognize the different regions of the world, and understand how events and processes influence one another. Topics covered include population, cultural patterns, cities and urban land use, and economic development.

Honors Foundations of the Modern World

Upper School

Grade 10

History and Social Science

Credits: 1

This course will cover the same content and themes as Foundations of the Modern World, incorporating more challenging readings and aiming for highly developed and nuanced writing. Assessments will largely center around document-based writing, and students will use scholarly sources to complete a final research paper.

Foundations of the Modern World

Upper School

Grade 10

History and Social Science

Credits: 1

Honors level also available

Foundations of the Modern World is an inquiry-based course that investigates how ideas, individuals, and social, political, and economic forces can serve to both integrate people and proliferate differences. Building on students’ understanding of worldwide patterns of interaction from Global Connections, Foundations of the Modern World will zoom in on the world since 1500, beginning with the birth of the modern nation-state. Students will first explore how historians interpret and reinterpret the past, then move into 18th century ideas and revolutions, the causes and effects of global industrialization and imperialism, and global war and peace. The course will culminate with a research project assessing how an individual can impact the world. Within each unit, students will examine how historical themes connect to, and help explain, modern world events as they unfold. Rich content and intentional skill instruction work simultaneously throughout the year, as students engage with a variety of written, visual, and primary and secondary sources, hone their historical thinking skills through developing evidence-based arguments, and communicate their ideas through clear and compelling speaking and writing.

Honors English: Literature of Identity

Upper School

Grade 10

English

Open to Grade 10 with department approval

Credits: 1

In all cultures on earth, people discover their own individual identities in the contexts familial, cultural, linguistic, religious, political, and historical. The job of the individual in many of the greatest works of literature is to construct and often to protect a self an identity that can withstand the slings and arrows of the world outside of itself. We present the students with works by authors from various continents in which cultures reflect and are reflected by compelling individual selves. A major poetry project prompts students to discover the poems from a place of their own interest, and we work through the challenges of poetic and cultural translation. Works may include: Shakespeare’s Othello, Murakami’s The Elephant Vanishes, Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Tagore’s A Wife’s Letter, Chopin’s The Awakening, Wharton’s Sanctuary, Woolf’s The Death of the Moth, Allende’s House of the Spirits, Brazilian filmmaker Walter Salles’ film Central do Brasil, Roy’s The God of Small Things, Morrison’s Sula, and poetry by Giovanni, Mistral, Du Fu, Szymborska, Amichai, Neruda, Lorca, and Akhmatova.

The Honors 10th grade English course will require lengthier and more challenging readings, essay topics, oral presentations and original research. Students in honors are expected to read with interest and intellectual curiosity.

English: Literature of Identity

Upper School

Grade 10

English

Credits: 1

Honors level also available

In all cultures on earth, people discover their own individual identities in the contexts familial, cultural, linguistic, religious, political and historical. The job of the individual, in many of the greatest works of literature, is to construct, and often, to protect a self, the identity that can withstand the slings and arrows of the world outside of itself. With an eye toward introducing works from each of the continents and in a wide variety of genres, we present the students with works in which cultures reflect and are reflected by compelling individual selves. A major poetry project prompts students to discover the poems from a place of their own interest, and we work through the challenges of poetic and cultural translation. Works may include: Shakespeare’s Othello or Macbeth, Murakami’s The Elephant Vanishes, Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Sagan’s Bonjour, Tristesse, Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus, Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea, Roy’s The God of Small Things, and poetry by Du Fu, Szymborska, Amichai, Neruda, Lorca, and Akhmatova.