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Signature Courses

Our signature courses combine direct action, experimentation, and improvisation.

Crowd-sourcing antibiotic discovery. Collaborating with published authors. Leading discussions on social justice and identity. Exploring veterinary science.

Walker’s offers unique courses that combine direct action, experimentation and improvisation with the opportunity to design real-world solutions and gain hands-on experience. In addition to reading more about our unique courses below, be sure to visit our department pages for a full array of course offerings.

Walker’s is among only five high schools in the United States invited to participate in the Tiny Earth Network (TEN), an innovative program formulated at Yale University that encourages students to pursue careers in science through hands-on experience and real-world laboratory and field research. Students from Walker’s join other students from around the world to crowdsource antibiotic discovery. Through a series of student-driven experiments, our girls collect soil samples, isolate diverse bacteria, test their bacteria against clinically relevant microorganisms, and characterize those showing antibiotic activity with the hope of developing new antibiotics.
What does it mean to be a writer? How does an author find her style? The Visiting Writer Seminar is a semester-long course in which students have the special opportunity to immerse themselves in a study of one writer’s works. Throughout the semester, students read a critical mass of texts by that writer before the course culminates with a visit by that person to the school. During this visit, the writer will teach master classes, conduct writing workshops, and participate in class discussions. The writer will also deliver a schoolwide assembly and a public reading to our community.
Inequality in the United States introduces students to systems of social inequality in the United States. Students investigate the structural, interpersonal, and social dimensions of oppression. Course materials explore the ways that racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, trans oppression, and religious oppression have developed over time as well as the ways they impact each of us every day. Students develop the language, tools, and skills to create positive social change.
Students in the Tropical Ecology class at Walker’s learn about the unique and fragile ecosystems of the tropics, paying close attention to the incredible biodiversity, current events, and conservation efforts. As a way to maximize their understanding of tropical ecosystems, students are immersed in both the complex environment and the culture of Panama in ways that are not possible in a classroom. Aligning with components of Walker’s Capabilities Approach including international experience, sustenance, and sustainability, students gain an unforgettable experience by working to truly become global citizens.
Advanced Multivariable Calculus covers topics that are not currently included in a traditional high school calculus course but may be included in a college-level calculus course. Students explore topics including but not limited to partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, vector fields, and integration over curves and surfaces.
Virgil’s Aeneid is the central text of Roman literature, and its hero, Aeneas, is at the center of the story. What makes a hero? What makes a leader? In this yearlong course, students explore Roman ideas of loyalty, loss and leadership through Virgil’s text. Through a study of meter, word order, poetic device and vocabulary, the course grapples with the themes of love and death, war and refugees, family, and fate. Students also delve into the politics and propaganda of the Age of Augustus and explore our own relationship to empire and unwanted war. Students express themselves through analytical essays as well as creative projects. Just as Aeneas’ Trojans had to work together to get to Rome, so too is collaboration an emphasis of this class, and students are expected (and assessed) on how well they work together.

Signature Courses

Honors Research Seminar lab
Honors Research Seminar

Walker’s is among only five high schools in the United States invited to participate in the Tiny Earth Network (TEN), an innovative program formulated at Yale University that encourages students to pursue careers in science through hands-on and real-world experience.

Visiting Writer Naomi Shihab Nye
Visiting Writer Seminar

In Walker’s Visiting Writer Seminar, students have the special opportunity to immerse themselves in a study of one writer’s works. The course culminates with a visit by that person to the school for a series of master classes and a public reading to our community.

Inequality in the U.S.
Inequality in the U.S.

Inequality in the United States introduces students to systems of social inequality in the United States. Students investigate the structural, interpersonal, and social dimensions of oppression.

Tropical Ecology lab
Tropical Ecology

Students in the Tropical Ecology class at Walker’s learn about the unique and fragile ecosystems of the tropics, paying close attention to the incredible biodiversity, current events, and conservation efforts.

Advanced Multivariable Calculus class
Advanced Multivariable Calculus

Advanced Multivariable Calculus covers topics that are not currently included in a traditional high school calculus course but may be included in a college-level calculus course.

Latin class
Holding Out for a Hero

In this yearlong course, students explore Roman ideas of loyalty, loss and leadership through Virgil’s text. Through a study of meter, word order, poetic device, and vocabulary, the course grapples with the themes of love and death, war and refugees, family, and fate.